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#101 Mar-10-2018 08:16:am

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 54

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

sschkaak wrote:

Can't see anything and the link doesn't work for me.  Most of us used to use Photobucket, but they've really screwed us, lately--charging crazy prices for what used to be free of charge.  Anyway, I've started using Flickr and posting their links to pictures.  I don't know how to embed them in a post, here.

Click the link below to to to a 'letter to the editor' of the  Herald-Star Newspaper by Rev. Werner Lange who attended the Remembrance at the Park in Gnaddenhutten on March 8th.  It contains one typo, he says the massacre occurred 226 years ago and it was 236 years ago.  He definitely knows the difference.  He was quite outspoken about the atrocity and he gives a good account of what was actually being lived out by the Delaware and the Moravians.  He has also agreed to help in any way he can to erect a cross at this site, which he maintains, is long overdue.

http://www.heraldstaronline.com/opinion … -realized/


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#102 Mar-10-2018 08:34:am

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 54

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Another effort by the Rev. Werner Lange, with all our thanks!


Dear Cleveland Indians staff,

As you may know, March 8th marked the 236th anniversary of the brutal massacre of 96 pacifist Christian Native Americans in Gnadenhutten (“Sanctuaries of Grace� ), a sacred site just about 100 miles south of Progressive Field.
At yesterday’s moving commemoration of that American tragedy, Lenape Native American representatives announced plans to at least dignify this historic site with placement of a large cross by the mound containing the corpses of the slaughtered Indians.
As a corporation which has reaped enormous financial benefits from the marketing of the insulting “Chief Wahoo�  symbol and name “Indians� , you are strongly encouraged to contribute to this important effort. Please contact the coordinator of the
Gnadenhutten Museum and/or the pastor of the Gnadenhutten Moravian Church for further details about how you can assist making the erection of a dignified cross at this site a reality. Please also share this message with the appropriate decision makers.
Thank you.


Sincerely,
Rev. Dr. Werner Lange


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#103 Mar-10-2018 09:45:am

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 54

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Based on the suggestion of Rev. Werner Lange, here is my effort to contact the Cleveland Indians Charities group.


My name is Gerard Heath.  I am a current member of the Moravian Band of the Delaware Indians, now known as the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown.

March 8th 2018, was the 236th anniversary of the Gnadenhutten Massacre of the Moravian Delaware Indians.  If you do not know, Gnadenhutten is the oldest existing settlement in the state of Ohio.  The remains of these 96 Christian Indians lay exposed to the forest animals and the weather for over 15 years before being piled in a mass grave called the Burial Mound for the Christian Indian Martyrs.  The Ohio Historical Society erected a marker at the site that calls the Gnadenhutten Massacre of March 8th 1782 a National Day of Shame.

My great great grandfather, Christian Moses Stonefish, dedicated the obelisk that stands in the Gnadenhutten Historical Park, erected as a memorial in 1872, and it is my family interred in that burial mound.  It is for this reason I am trying to raise awareness of the day and to raise funds to erect a Christian Cross at the burial mound and erect wrought iron fencing around other appropriate areas in the park.

We are thankful that Chief Wahoo is being removed from your uniforms next year but I would like you to go one step further.  As a show of good faith, and in an effort to make amends, it would be a great public relations effort if the Cleveland Indians donated the money to erect the cross and wrought iron fencing.

I have gone over your website, particularly your 'Diversity Advisory Board' section and was disappointed to see many minority groups represented such as the National Society of Hispanic MBAs, the National Black MBA Association, the Ohio Latino Affairs Commission, and others but no representation from the Native American community.  I am also sure that this is something you want to resolve and if I can help in any way, please let me know.

Follow this link to a YouTube video that tells the story of the massacre and speaks to my request to erect a Christian Cross.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yg0-ME64L64&t=1s  A Cross for Gnadenhutten

Please contact me for details about the site or the massacre and how the Cleveland Indians can get involved in preserving and promoting this sacred site. 

Tax deductible deductions can be sent to:

The Gnadenhutten Historical Society - Christian Cross Project

c/o John Heil

156 Spring St.

Gnadenhutten, Ohio  44629

Thank you for considering my request and may God bless you for your support of these Wilderness Christians.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#104 Jun-21-2018 08:15:pm

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 54

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Today is June 21st and I am sitting in a campground near Gnadenhutten, Ohio.  It has been over 3 months since my last post after the Remembrance at the Park held on March 8th, the anniversary date of the Gnadenhutten massacre, and I am here to begin the process of installing a cross at the burial mound.

I met with the Tribal Council at Moraviantown on May 16th to discuss the cross, some human remains at the park, and the possibility of the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown getting involved in the effort of the Ohio Historical Connection to interpret the massacre site for visitors.

While I wait for the tribe to respond, I intend to take the bull by the horns and begin the installation process.  Over $5k has been raised for the cross and I will begin to spend that money preparing the site for the installation.  I have to establish a respectable perimeter around the mound, and see about getting a foundation poured to receive the cross when finished.

If anything of note occurs over the next few days while I am at the park, I will post it here as there seems to be a silent interest in this endeavor on this forum.  Since March 8th, there have been almost 20,000 reads on this thread. 

For those interested in this thread, you should also pay attention to the other thread on this History page titled, "The first treaty between the US and an Indian nation still matters."  I maintain that the Gnadenhutten Massacre was due to the Delaware signing the Fort Pitt Treaty and being promised entry into the new United States as the 14th state.  The Delaware held up their end of the treaty and the United States broke that treaty as well as every other treaty they ever had with an Indian Nation.

Follow that thread as well as I develop that thought.

Getting dark and the mosquitoes are beginning to bite around the campsite so I will put it away for now.  More to come.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#105 Jun-24-2018 09:17:am

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 54

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Today is June 24th, St. John's Day, and I have been at the Gnadenhutten Historical Park & Museum for the last two days.  I'm camping nearby and coming to the park each day to volunteer my services around the place and I have had the opportunity to meet many fine people.

I was very happy to see, upon my arrival, that the efforts have already begun to establish a respectable perimeter around the mound to keep drivers and pedestrians back about 10' from the base of the mound.  The sidewalk that actually touched the burial mound has been removed and grass is growing to fill in where the sidewalk was and drivers have been moved back and grass is filling in on all sides.  Previously, gravel touched the mound on two sides and has been replaced by green grass and it looks great, a 100% turnaround since my last visit.  My thanks and gratitude go out to all the folks in Gnadenhutten who made this happen, particularly John Heil, curator of the museum who works tirelessly at the park daily as a volunteer!

We have been working for the last two days tearing out cabinets and sinks in the concession area and replacing them with updated fixtures.  In the process, we discovered that the wiring was sub par and not up to code so we fixed that at the same time.  I'll be here for a day or two more to get the concession area refurbished but that is not the story I want to tell.  The story I find interesting at this place is the visitors that come daily to walk around the park and tour the museum and the cabins where the massacre took place. 

On Saturday, it fell to me to help out at the museum and lead a few tours around the grounds.  This was a great experience to actually talk to the visitors and learn what they know, and do not know, about the Gnadenhutten Massacre.  One of the line items I put before the Delaware Nation Tribal Council on May 16th was the need for interpretive signage, at least, around the park so visitors can read and know what occurred there.  To a person, they were fascinated, and horrified, by the tale told about the massacre of these gentle Christian souls and they were surprised that there was no information available to visitors out in the park.

The most surprising visitor that came to the park while I was working was Chief Denise Stonefish from the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown.  I thought my eyes were playing tricks on me as she approached me and said, "Hello Gerard, nice to see you again."  After both of us expressing surprise to find each other at the park at the same time we had a discussion about why she was there.  She was around the area on personal business and decided to come over to the park to look over the various line items I left with the council in May to make her own determination.  As we spoke, a car pulled up over the grass and right up to the chain barrier erected to keep people from actually driving up on the burial mound.  She got to see first hand what the problem was and thought that the perimeter needed to be established sooner rather than later.

Each night before retiring I build a fire near the mound and make a tobacco offering and pray that the next steps are carefully taken to erect a cross at the burial mound.  I call it 'smudging the mound'.  I place two bricks side by side at the base of the mound, upwind, and then place a piece of burning wood on the bricks so as not to burn the grass, and finally I place four twists of tobacco on the burning embers and the tobacco smoke rolls over the mound.  To my surprise, it actually acted like a lawn sprinkler with the wind shifting and spreading smoke over the mound from side to side.  The smoke seemed to hug the mound as it went up the mound and down the other side before being blown away and the odor carried to the Creator.   To be the only one in the park at midnight performing this Midsummer Night ritual was awesome in every sense of the word!

Today is another day and as I begin pulling wire, I look forward to what comes next.









,


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#106 Jun-24-2018 11:47:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
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Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Thanks for that post, Gerard.  Wish I could have been there.

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#107 Jun-25-2018 08:26:am

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 54

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

You are most welcome! 

It is now Monday morning and I'm looking out past the burial mound towards the obelisk and the reconstructed cabins where the massacre took place as I load my vehicle to head for home.  The electrician got called away yesterday and as a result I spent the bulk of the day trimming trees and carrying brush.  The place looks great! 

I feel much progress was made toward the installation of a cross at the burial mound, of course not as much as I would have liked, but things are falling into place. 

It is my hope and prayer that the visit of Chief Denise Stonefish this  past weekend will lead to the involvement of the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown in doing a Lenape interpretation of this site aided by the Ohio Historical Connection.

We'll see.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#108 Aug-16-2018 01:38:pm

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 54

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Pioneer Days in Gnadenhutten  August 3-5 2018

It has been nearly two weeks since I attended the annual Pioneer Days celebration in Gnadenhutten, Ohio.  It was the first time I have attended this event as it is celebrating a space in time that occurred long after the Moravian Delaware had a presence there.  The times depicted are circa 1840 and the Moravian Indian Massacre, ending our presence there, took place in 1782.   

Regardless, when I was invited by John Heil, curator of the  Gnadenhutten Historical Park & Museum, to come and say a few words to the campers and attendees about the Cross for Gnadenhutten Project, I accepted and did attend Saturday and Sunday.  John has done so much for the Cross Project and as a volunteer at this sacred site, I was happy to do anything I could for the main fundraising effort of the year.  The good news is that this year the museum and park raised more money than any year in the past!

There were some unique aspects to this years Pioneer Days.  For the first time there was a Moravian Delaware Indian presence and a Moravian Church presence roaming the grounds.  Also, and perhaps historic, on Sunday morning a Moravian pastor, Darrell Johnson (no relation to Theresa), once more gave a sermon and held a traditional Love Feast at the site of the original chapel, with a Moravian Delaware Indian sitting in the pews.  The singularity of the moment did not escape me.

Other unique aspects were that Theresa Johnson of the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown was also invited to speak to the crowd about her ancestors relationship to the park and the burial mound.  Theresa also donated a native made sweet grass basket that sold for $275.00 at the Pioneer Day Crock Auction.

A particularly special moment for me was a visit to the park on Saturday by Ms. Nancy Hoffman and her daughter who drove from  Pennsylvania to hand deliver a generous donation for the Cross for Gnadenhutten fund.  Nancy introduced herself to me as the 5th great granddaughter of Moravian Missionary Johannes Roth who actually preached in the chapel at Gnadenhutten and was a missionary at the time of the massacre.  She was very happy to hear about the Cross Project and said it is a natural for a monument and is long overdue. 

It was nice to meet Theresa Johnson who is passionate about the burial mound and the park.  We are hoping to convince her and her sister to come to the Remembrance at the Park next March 8, 2019 and sing Amazing Grace in Lenape accompanied by a native flute.  Each year this event grows, and will continue to  grow.

Maybe next year, there will be a Cross for Gnadenhutten casting it's shadow on the burial mound.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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