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#1 Sep-23-2007 08:35:pm

sschkaak
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A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

1. Below is Jim Revey's great aunt, Elizabeth Richardson Vanderveer, with her daughter, Luxemma, circa 1880.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/ElizabethRichardsonVandermeer.jpg


2. This plate is from THE REAL AMERICANS, by A. Hyatt Verrill, New York, 1954.  The five men standing, in the picture on the lower right, are Sand Hill Indians (L to R:  Robert Richardson; Jonathan Richardson; Ryers Crummel; Isaac Richardson; Robert Revey) at one of their gatherings in the 1920's.  A similar photo will be seen futher on.

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3. Lone Bear's paternal grandparents, Johnson and Restelle Revey, circa 1925.

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4. This image (upper left), from "Ceremonial Dress of the Delaware Man," by James Howard, shows the five members of the Sand Hill Indian Council (L to R:  Robert Revey; Isaac Richardson; Chief Ryers Crummel; Jonathan Richardson; Robert Richardson), during the 1920's.  The photo in the upper right shows New Jersey Governor Driscoll being "inducted" into the tribe, during the 1949 NJ State Fair.  Plains style warbonnets were "fashionable," countrywide, during this era.  The rest of the regalia is pure Lenape.  A young Jim Revey stands in back of the Governor, wearing the traditional yoke made by his maternal grandmother.  The bottom left photo shows five Sand Hill Indian men, at one of their gatherings, in 1964.  The picture on the bottom right (taken in the 1940's) shows a Sand Hill Indian wearing the very ancient "turkey hat."  This one incorporates both Lenape and Cherokee designs.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/VariousSandHillIndians001.jpg


5. Chief Ryers Crummel (right) and his two daughters, Virginia (middle) and Clorice (left).  [This replaces a previously posted photo.]

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/chief_ryersdaughters_1947.jpg


6. My good friend of many years, the late Jim "Lone Bear" Revey (1924-1998).  The floral beaded vest was made by his mother.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/JimRevey.jpg


7. Christina Dickerson in her regalia and fan with seven-point Cherokee star design.  [This replaces a previously posted photo.]

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/christina_dickerson.jpg


8. Another photo of the Sand Hill Indians at the 1949 State Fair in Trenton, NJ.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/4SandHillIndiansin1949.jpg

Last edited by sschkaak (Oct-18-2010 12:55:pm)

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#2 Sep-23-2007 08:57:pm

sschkaak
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

9. Jim Revey at his New Jersey Indian Office, 300 Main St., Orange, NJ, in 1986.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/4SandHillIndiansin19492.jpg


10. Below is a color picture of Jim, in his seventies.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/INDIAN.jpg

Last edited by sschkaak (Oct-06-2009 10:05:am)

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#3 Sep-23-2007 09:22:pm

sschkaak
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

All the items below were made by LONE BEAR INDIAN CRAFT CO., in the Lenape style, during the 1980's (except for the first item, which is somewhat older).  At one time, in the 1950's, there were more than thirty Sand Hill Indians employed in making traditional Lenape and Cherokee craftwork.  By the time the following items were made, only three craftworkers remained, though some Sand Hill Indians continue their unbroken legacy of crafting, to this day. 


1. Here is the traditional and ancient "turkey hat." 

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/SandHillIndianturkeyhat0032.jpg


2. Below is a bear fur turban.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/IM000389.jpg


3. Beaded man's yoke, showing the three Lenape phratry symbols.  This particular item is commercial tan, but still nicely worked.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/IM000390.jpg


4. Brain-tanned hunter's bag with Lenape five-point star and Algonquian double-curve motif.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/IM000391.jpg


5. Broadcloth breechclout panels (dance aprons).  The twelve plates on the turtle are symbolic–not natural.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/IM000392.jpg

Last edited by sschkaak (Jul-22-2008 11:34:pm)

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#4 Sep-23-2007 09:39:pm

sschkaak
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

6. Commercial-tanned man's leggings.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/IM000393.jpg


7. Deer-hoof dance garters (edge-beaded brain-tanned deerskin).

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/IM000394.jpg


8. Brain-tanned Lenape woman's moccasins.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/IM000395.jpg


9. Two turkey-feather fans (man's and woman's), with Lenape star design.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/IM000396.jpg


10. Exact replica of the Penn Treaty Belt (1682), done in shell (mother-of-pearl) wampum beads.  There are over 3,000 beads in this belt.

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/IM000397.jpg

Last edited by sschkaak (May-02-2009 07:38:pm)

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#5 Sep-24-2007 03:02:am

oldsalty
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From: Long way from the Northern Hem
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

Thankyou sschkaak for sharing this information and photos of the Sandhills. It is awesome that they have managed to maintain their identity in New Jersey and surrounding areas and as Lenape are still present in the original homeland.
Old Salty

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#6 Sep-24-2007 05:58:pm

dennison
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Registered: Sep-10-2007
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

sschkaak:

There use to be a shop in NYC that displayed Sandhill Craft items . I though it was run by a Sandhill however that was some time ago maybe late 70's or early 80's.  Wonder if it is stll open. Anyway, the work was really good especially the war clubs. I wish I would of gotten some.




Al

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#7 Sep-24-2007 09:35:pm

sschkaak
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

Al:

That was probably Jim Revey's shop.   He had a shop in NYC, for a long time.

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#8 Sep-24-2007 10:45:pm

NanticokePiney
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From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

dennison wrote:

sschkaak:

There use to be a shop in NYC that displayed Sandhill Craft items . I though it was run by a Sandhill however that was some time ago maybe late 70's or early 80's.  Wonder if it is stll open. Anyway, the work was really good especially the war clubs. I wish I would of gotten some.
Al

That was Lone Bear Revey's shop. His work was really good. My Grandpop Joseph took me up there when I was a kid.


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#9 Jul-17-2008 05:12:pm

thunderchicken
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

I don't think the five pointed star is lenape but of Cherokee origin............Thanks for the pics.........


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#10 Jul-17-2008 05:29:pm

sschkaak
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

thunderchicken wrote:

I don't think the five pointed star is lenape but of Cherokee origin............Thanks for the pics.........

tc:

I only know what I was told by Jim Revey.   He claimed the design originated from the practice of his folks sewing starfish on their clothing.  (They were from the Jersey shore.)  The Cherokee star used by the Sand Hill Indians has seven points.  I also recall buying a German silver scarf slide from Touching Leaves Indian Craft Co. (Lenape) in Dewey, OK, which had a five-point star.

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#11 Jul-17-2008 05:36:pm

tree hugger
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

Stupid question here:

Aren't the Sandhills Lenape as well as Cherokee?

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#12 Jul-17-2008 06:31:pm

sschkaak
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

tree hugger wrote:

Stupid question here:

Aren't the Sandhills Lenape as well as Cherokee?

Yes.

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#13 Jul-17-2008 06:39:pm

tree hugger
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

I didn't mean to get in the middle of a discussion. 


Haha I typed a bunch of thoughts I just deleted, nevermind. neutral

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#14 Jul-17-2008 06:58:pm

sschkaak
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

tree hugger wrote:

I didn't mean to get in the middle of a discussion. 


Haha I typed a bunch of thoughts I just deleted, nevermind. neutral

Huh?  I thought that's what a forum was for.   smile

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#15 Jul-17-2008 07:15:pm

NanticokePiney
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From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

tree hugger wrote:

Haha I typed a bunch of thoughts I just deleted, nevermind. neutral

HA! You "sschaaked out" on us!   lol


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#16 Jul-17-2008 07:20:pm

tree hugger
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

Well you all know how my mind wanders and wanders...

I'm curious about the history of the Sandhills and the Cherokees, time wise. If they were combined together then wouldn't that explain alot of "mixed culture" out east here and even in Oklahoma?. I know that things evolved and different nations (even Plains) were adapted into what was lost. Look at how close Haude and Lenape are sometimes.

So here we have THE perfect example of a Native "combined" culture coming together. But yet the Cherokees and many others think the Sandhills aren't for real? I have no clue, nor do I want to, about the current politics with the Sandhills. I'm not going there. 

The Cherokees lost alot of their culture on removal also. A great example is their modern day tear dress. Because they did not have one that was just theirs.

I personally think it's a shame that they, and others, can't be recognized (not state or federally) by the very people that are descended from them.

Idiot rant over. tongue

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#17 Jul-17-2008 07:52:pm

sschkaak
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

T-H:

Yes, there is some combining of the two cultures.  However, most Sand Hill Indians emphasize one or the other of the two cultures.  Jim Revey was very Lenape-oriented.  Claire Garland is very Cherokee-oriented.  But, each have both Lenape and Cherokee ancestors.

As far as being recognized is concerned, I'd point out that Jim Revey was, for a time, the designated representative for the Delaware Tribe of Indians, in certain business dealings with the New Jersey state government--even though he was not a citizen of that Tribe.

It is not politically expedient for the CNO to "recognize" the Sand Hill Indians.  I sincerely doubt that any CNO official ever even met a Sand Hill Indian.  They just issue blanket condemnations, in a kind of politically-motivatied "cover-all-bases" expediency.   

I wouldn't say that one people are "descended" from another.  All Lenape and Cherokee people, wherever they may have stayed or moved, have a *common* ancestry with all other Lenape or Cherokee people, as the case may be.

Last edited by sschkaak (Oct-20-2009 10:59:pm)

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#18 Jul-17-2008 08:08:pm

tree hugger
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

As far as being recognized is concerned, I'd point out that Jim Revey was, for a time, the designated representative for the Delaware Tribe of Indians, in certain business dealings with the New Jersey state government--even though he was not a citizen of that Tribe.

Well that IS interesting.


As for the descended part, I don't choose my words as well as I should. I get what you mean though.

Thanks.

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#19 Jul-17-2008 08:34:pm

tree hugger
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

LOL Sorry I thought I was done but I'm not.

I know you're not the spokesman for the Sandhills, but there is so little on them to learn.

If they flip back and forth between Lenape and Cherokee between leadership, doesn't that get a bit confusing?

What I'm trying to say is do they have programs for the youth, gatherings, etc? I guess this whole time I thought that they had melded the two together. Not making up their own culture but a way of combining both to create their own identity (from way back).

So I'm guessing there are two factions of them? One Lenape oriented, the other Cherokee.

Sometimes I really wish I was back in Jersey (sort of) just to sit down and learn. hmm

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#20 Jul-17-2008 09:32:pm

sschkaak
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

The Sand Hill Indians are farmers, tradesmen and professionals, who've been living in the manner of the dominant society for over two hundered years.  Nearly all of them are Christians, and have been since the 18th-century.  Many of them have retained a knowledge of traditional food preparation, folk medicine, craftwork and clan affiliation--but, in most cases, "our culture" is their culture.  So, what differences in cultural traits they've retained from their two indigenous cultures, pale in comparison to the common culture of modern, everyday life.  There *are* amalgams.  See the photo, above, of the man wearing the turkey feather hat.  The hat, itself, is Lenape in origin, but the scroll design is Cherokee.  And pan-Indianism is also a factor.  Note the Plains style "war bonnets" and vests, on some of them.  That was a *HUGE* cultural influence, at a certain period of history.  It still is, with some. 

Now, I wonder who I've pissed off!  But, I haven't said anything, here, which Jim Revey didn't tell me, himself.

Some of your questions I can't answer, because I honestly don't know the answers:  such as what programs they might have.

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#21 Jul-18-2008 04:29:am

thunderchicken
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From: Fairbanks Alaska
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

The star scarf slide is a common design worn by alot of different nations in OK. plus Nora Thompson Dean was from the eastern Delaware who lived among the Cherokee, you are right that the cherokee use a seven pointed star but I've never seen any Delaware beadwork, quillwork, or ribbonwork that have a star design or anything close to it. Maybe the starfish thing has some merit but it must be exclusive to the Sandhill.


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#22 Jul-18-2008 08:22:am

sschkaak
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

thunderchicken wrote:

The star scarf slide is a common design worn by alot of different nations in OK. plus Nora Thompson Dean was from the eastern Delaware who lived among the Cherokee, you are right that the cherokee use a seven pointed star but I've never seen any Delaware beadwork, quillwork, or ribbonwork that have a star design or anything close to it. Maybe the starfish thing has some merit but it must be exclusive to the Sandhill.

Yes.  I think you're right, on both counts.  The scarf slide *may* be a Native American Church thing.  The five-point star is probably local to the Jersey shore Lenape.

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#23 Jul-18-2008 05:08:pm

sschkaak
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

Thought this would be of interest to some.  It's a 1985 price list from the late Jim Revey's LONE BEAR INDIAN CRAFT CO.  It shows the kinds of craftwork being done by the Sand Hill Indians, just twenty-three years ago. 

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/scan00013.jpg
/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/scan0002.jpg
/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/scan00032.jpg
/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/scan0004.jpg

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#24 Jul-18-2008 05:17:pm

tree hugger
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

Oh my gosh, the price of the moccasins. smile

Thanks for sharing, he sounds like he was a good man. Makes me a little sad.

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#25 Jul-19-2008 01:47:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
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Re: A Sand Hill Indian pictorial - people and craftwork

That five-point star design was also used by the Delaware at Six Nations Reserve, Ontario.  Here it is on their Big House drum beaters, dating from the early 1800's. 

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/scan0005.jpg

Source:  THE CELESTIAL BEAR COMES DOWN TO EARTH, by F.G. Speck & Jesse Moses, Reading, PA (1945), page 44.

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