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#1 Apr-30-2015 04:48:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4293
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Upper Delaware River Outing for Delaware Indian youth

Native American youths to spend 10 days

in recreation area on federal grant




By David Pierce

Pocono Record Writer

Posted Apr. 29, 2015



The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area has been awarded a federal grant to help youth from three Native American tribes reconnect with their heritage.

Fifteen teens from the Delaware Nation and Delaware Tribe, both of Oklahoma, and the Stockbridge-Munsee Nation, of Wisconsin, will spend 10 days this summer camping in and exploring the national park once inhabited by their ancestors. They will be accompanied by three chaperones.

The local recreation area was awarded $22,146 from a $26 million federal-private Centennial Challenge fund, created in honor of the National Park Service’s 100th anniversary next year. About 100 national park units in 31 states received project funding.

“We’re really excited about it,” said Kristy Boscheinen, chief of the park’s Special Projects Division. “It is quite an honor for us.”

It will be matched with another $22,146 from the recreation area’s mitigation fund. The mitigation fund was created by two electrical utilities as compensation for the unavoidable environmental impacts of allowing taller towers and more powerful lines to cross the national park near Bushkill.

The tribes were consulted during the required federal environmental review of the Susquehanna-to-Roseland, New Jersey power line project. The native groups commented on project impacts to historical and cultural resources in the park.

Those contacts led to the grant proposal to bring native youth to the national park.

“It’s their initiative,” Boscheinen said. “We’re quite happy to work with them on it.”

The teens will stay at the park’s Pocono Environmental Education Center in Lehman Township. The tentative agenda includes field trips in the national park and the federally designated Upper Delaware Wild and Scenic River in New York State. Boating and camping trips are likely.

National Park Service archaeologists and natural resource specialists will assist with programming.
“It truly connects with their heritage in a very meaningful way,” Boscheinen said.

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#2 Apr-30-2015 08:08:am

tree hugger
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Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11050

Re: Upper Delaware River Outing for Delaware Indian youth

That's awesome.

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#3 Apr-30-2015 08:36:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4293
Website

Re: Upper Delaware River Outing for Delaware Indian youth

Yes.  I don't think they're going to sign any "treaties," though.   tongue

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#4 Apr-30-2015 08:38:am

tree hugger
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Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11050

Re: Upper Delaware River Outing for Delaware Indian youth

lollol

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#5 Apr-30-2015 08:40:am

NanticokePiney
Member
From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
Registered: Jul-10-2007
Posts: 4214

Re: Upper Delaware River Outing for Delaware Indian youth

Not even with "Chief" Depaul???? yikes


   lollollollol


I don't have anger issues...just violent reactions to B.S.
---------------------------------------------------
      Warning:  Some Profanity
This might cause you to experience reason

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#6 Jul-29-2015 09:57:am

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4293
Website

Re: Upper Delaware River Outing for Delaware Indian youth

Teens walk in ancestors footsteps at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area

Past, present and future have all come into focus for 15 Native American teens who are attending camp at the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.


By David Pierce

Pocono Record Writer

Posted Jul. 28, 2015 at 6:00 PM

http://www.poconorecord.com/article/201 … /150729436

Attendees from three tribes — two in Oklahoma and one in Wisconsin — have been brought here through a federal grant to learn about their ancestors who once called this region home, connect with each other, and acquire skills and insights that can be applied to future careers. They were selected after submitting essays explaining why they wanted to come here.

Native Americans from the Midwest get a bit of exposure to the careers of anthropology and archeology during the career fair at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area on Tuesday, July 28, 2015.

They’ve gone canoeing, fishing and hiking, found turtles that National Park Service biologists are monitoring with tracking devices, visited the federally-protected Upper Delaware River in New York State, visited Grey Towers National Historic Site in Milford and taken in an archaeological dig at an undisclosed location. They stay each night in circular-shaped yurts at the Pocono Environmental Education Center.

On Tuesday, they attended a presentation at Smithfield Beach of careers available through the National Park Service.

“I wanted to learn more about my ancestors, what was around, why they were here,” said Debbie Eckiwaudah, 16, of the Delaware Nation based at Anadarko, southwest Oklahoma. “You know when you go somewhere and you want to go home? I actually feel at home right now.”

She called the archaeological dig the highlight of her visit so far.

“Just the excitement of one more shovel of dirt; there could be an arrowhead or a spear,” Debbie said. “Just knowing your ancestor touched that, knowing a little more about your people.”

Sioux Collom, 17, grew up off the reservation in Eagle, Wisconsin but wanted to know more about her Stockbridge-Munsee heritage. The college-bound student noted her grandmother serves on the tribal council in Bowler, Wisconsin, north of Green Bay.

“I’m really into turtles and they told me there would be a lot of wildlife here,” said Sioux, who particularly enjoyed her visit to Grey Towers, once the estate of former Pennsylvania Governor and pioneer conservationist Gifford Pinchot. “Now that I’ve been here, I feel like getting a horticultural internship at Grey Towers.”

Shu-day Johnson, 16, of the Delaware Tribe in Bartlesville, northeast Oklahoma, said he was impressed with his first trip to the northern U.S.

“I enjoyed the hiking, seeing the overpasses, and I enjoyed the canoeing,” he said. “I’ll teach my little brother and little sister about what I learned here.”  Shu-day’s grandmother — Cecilia Biggoose — is a tribal affordable housing officer and former social services worker who is thrilled to be chaperoning the five attendees from her tribe.

“I think sometimes the Creator works in mysterious ways and we’re here for a reason,” said Biggoose, who wants to share what she learned here with the folks back home. “I’m also here to pray for our descendants who were left behind. We prayed when we came and we’ll pray before we go back.”   

Lauren French, who is chaperoning five students from the Delaware Nation, said the 10-day program has provided historical knowledge leading to a better understanding of their Lenape identity along the Delaware River basin. Her tribe relocated 28 times during the white westward expansion. 

“They can hold their history in their hands,” French said of attendees. “A lot of their families have never been here.  “We’ve learned a lot — even the chaperons — a lot of ideas we can bring home,” she added.

Tony Granquist, the Stockbridge-Munsee chaperone, said he is struck by the natural beauty here and how the geography contrasts with that in Wisconsin. The Delaware River basin must have provided abundant food, water and shelter for his ancestors, he said.

“You can see why our ancestors settled here,” Granquist said.

Granquist, who operates a recreation center on the reservation, said the park service has gone to great lengths to provide a quality experience for the teens.

“If they never get to do it again, it’ll be one of the great experiences of their life,” Granquist said. “A lot of them didn’t know they are connected to the area and to the other tribes.”

Park service officials presented overviews Tuesday of possible NPS careers that include law enforcement, security and rescues; cultural anthropology and historic preservation; biology and agricultural management.
               
{Some pictures at the link.}

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